Rudolph Weisenborn (1879-1974)

 

BORN: October 30, 1879[1] Chicago

DIED:  March 15, 1974 Chicago

MARRIED: 1922 Alfreda “Fritzi” Gordon[2] of  St. Joseph, MO

 

TRAINING

1898 University of North Dakota

1905-1907 Students School of Art, Denver, Henry Reed[3]

1907-1910 Jean Mannheim School of Art, Denver

ART RELATED EMPLOYMENT[4]

c.1910 Commercial illustration, Denver

c.1910 Portrait sketches, Denver Post

1913 Window designer for Marshall Field and Company

1922 Illustrated for The Wave

c.1930s Diorama, Fight Against Soil Erosion, Tennessee Valley Authority[5]

1931 Lecture, The Abstract in Painting, Renaissance Society of the University of Chicago

1933 Mural Machine Movement[6], Pavilion No. 4, General Exhibits Building, A Century of Progress World’s Fair, Chicago[7]

1934-1939 Federal Art Project, easel and mural division[8]

1936 Mural, Contemporary Chicago, Louis Nettelhorst Elementary School, Chicago[9]

1937 Mural, Richard Crane Technical High School, Chicago: Electricians; Boilermakers Pipe Fitters, and Architects and Steelworkers[10]

TEACHING

1922 Chicago Hull House[11]

1920-1937,[12] 1939[13] Chicago Academy of Fine Arts

1935-1964 Weisenborn School of Modern Art [privately], Chicago[14]

RESIDENCES

1879-1888 Chicago

1888-1905 North Dakota

1893 Wisconsin

1894 Minnesota and Oklahoma

1905-1910 Colorado

1910-1913 Cripple Creek, CO

c.1913[15]-c.1960 Chicago;[16] 1940s-1960s Santa Fe, New Mexico (summers)[17]

c.1960-1974 Oak Park, Illinois

TRAVEL

c.1930s Cape Cod, Massachusetts

1950 Provincetown, Massachusetts[18]

MEMBERSHIPS/OFFICES

All-Illinois Society of Fine Arts (advisory board 1926)

American Abstract Artists[19]

Artists’ Equity Association, Midwest (president 1952)

Artists’ League of the Midwest (charter member 1947)[20]

Artists’ Union, Chicago Chapter (executive committee/founder)[21]

Cor Ardens (vice president, 1921-1922; treasurer 1922-1923)

Chicago No-Jury Society of Artists (founder, president 1922-1926)[22]

Chicago Society of Artists (board 1926-1927)

Independent Society of Artists, Chicago

Introspectives, Chicago[23]

Neo-Arlimusc (founder, president 1926-1928)[24]

Palette & Chisel Club

Society of Independent Artists

HONORS

1928 Honorable Mention architectural subject, Art Institute of Chicago, American Annual[25]

1931 Third Honorable Mention, Ninety and Nine Artists[26]

1941 Prize, Laura Davidson Sears Academy of Fine Arts, Elgin, Contemporary American Art

1957 William H. Tuthill Prize, Art Institute, Chicago & Vicinity

JURIES SERVED

Art Institute, Chicago & Vicinity 1923

Chicago Society of Artists annual 1924

Covenant Club under auspices of American Jewish Artists Club, First Annual Exhibition by Jewish Artists of Chicago and Vicinity 1936[27]

Jewish Education Building, Chicago under auspices of American Jewish Artists Club, Annual Exhibition by Jewish Artists of Chicago and Vicinity 1955, 1956[28]

Sears Academy of Fine Arts annual, Elgin, Illinois  1941

South Side Swedish Club, Chicago Artists of Swedish Descent

GROUP EXHIBITIONS

All-Illinois Society of Fine Art annual 1926, 1927

American Abstract Artists, annuals 1938-on

American Art Congress 1937

Art Institute of Chicago, A Half Century of American Art 1939

Art Institute of Chicago, Abstract and Surrealist American Art 1947

Art Institute of Chicago, Abstractions By Eight Artists 1942

Art Institute of Chicago, American Annual 1928, 1929, 1939, 1941-1943, 1945, 1947

Art Institute of Chicago, American Watercolors 1923, 1925,[29] 1931, 1934, 1942-1944, 1946, 1949

Art Institute of Chicago, Federal Art Project 1938[30]

Art Institute of Chicago, Room of Chicago Art 1945

Art Institute of Chicago, Society For Contemporary American Art 1953

Art Institute of Chicago, Work by 17 Chicago Artists, [work from the W.P.A.] 1936[31]

Art Institute, Chicago & Vicinity 1918, 1920, 1921, 1923, 1929, 1933, 1934, 1943, 1948, 1949

Artists Equity Association, Chicago 1950, 1951

Artists League of the Midwest 1947, c.1950

Associated American Artists Galleries, Chicago 1950

Association of American Artists, Chicago, Artists-Teachers 1950

Cedar Rapids Art Association 1921[32]

Chicago No-Jury Society of Artists 1922-1926,[33] 1928[34]-1931,[35] 1932, 1934, 1938, 1941, 1957[36]

Chicago No-Jury Society of Artists directors at Moulin Rouge café, Chicago 1926

Cor Ardens, Arts Club of Chicago 1922

Elizabeth Nelson Galleries, Chicago, Chicago Artists 1950

European Art Tour, under auspices of Mrs. John Alden Carpenter of Chicago 1924[37]

Evansville, IN 1922[38]

Findlay Gallery, Chicago, Best Paintings by Chicago Modernists 1933[39]

Findlay Galleries, Chicago, Frank Holland Critic's Choice 1950

Paul Gaulois Gallery, Chicago, Inaugural Show 1926

Illinois Academy of Fine Arts 1926

Illinois Woman’s Athletic Club, Beidler Gallery, Men Painters of Chicago and Illinois 1927, 1928

Increase Robinson Studio Gallery, Chicago, Flower Show by Chicago Artists, 1932

Increase Robinson’s Studio Gallery, Chicago, artists invited to submit decoration themes for A Century of Progress World’s Fair 1933[40]

Independent Society of Artists, Chicago 1918

Introspectives, Arts Club of Chicago 1921

Kroch’s Books Store Gallery, Chicago, Chicago Artists 1929

Madison, Wisconsin Art Association, Eleven Chicago Artists 1926

Magnificent Mile Art Show, Chicago 1955

Milwaukee Art Museum, Cor Ardens 1922

Moulton and Ricketts Gallery, Chicago 1913

Neo Arlimusc Society, Exhibition of the Nude, 1927

Neo Arlimusc Society, Bidding Sale, 1927

Neo Arlimusc Society, Themes of Chicago, 1927

Neo Arlimusc Society, Summer Exhibition (Radical Artists of Chicago), 1928[41]

Neo Arlimusc Society, Chicago Moderns in honor of Julius Meier-Graefe 1928[42]

Newark Museum of Art, Works selected from the Society of Independents 1926

Ninety and Nine Association 1931[43]

Pageant of Progress at Congress Hall, Municipal Pier, Chicago 1921[43a]

Palette & Chisel Club annual 1917,[44] 1918,[45] 1919

Palette & Chisel Club, Salon des Refuses 1919[46]

Provincetown Art Association annual 1950, 1951

Renaissance Society, Drawings by Contemporary Artists 1943

Renaissance Society, Form at Play: Abstractions in Various Materials by Chicago Artists 1948

Renaissance Society, Paintings in Color 1955

Renaissance Society, Representative Works by Chicago Artists 1946

Renaissance Society, Works by Chicago Artists Loaned by Chicago Collectors 1941

Renaissance Society, Works Made for the W. P. A. 1934

Rothschild Department Store, Chicago, Salon des Refuses 1921

Society of Independent Artists 1924, 1926, 1934

St. Louis Art Museum, Currents of Expansion: Painting in the Midwest 1820-1940, 1977

Terra Museum of American Art 1992

Terra Museum of American Art, Chicago Modern 1893-1945 2004

Visitors Tourist Bureau, Chicago, Progressive Chicago Artists 1933

ONE, TWO OR THREE MAN EXHIBITIONS

1915 Marshall Field & Co. Galleries

1917 Marshall Field & Co. Galleries[47]

1918 Moulton & Ricketts, (paintings of unique impressionism)[48]

1922 Grace Hickox Studio, Fine Arts Building, Chicago[49]

1922 The Piccadilly Tea Room, Fine Arts Building, Chicago, works in tempera[50]

1923 Marshall Field & Co. Galleries

1926 Chicago Randolph Theater[51]

1926 Washington Book Company, Chicago[52]

1927 Chicago Playhouse Theater[53]

1927 Stutz Petite Salon, Chicago[54]

1928 The Cube little theater, Chicago[55]

1930 Chicago Woman’s Aid[56]

1930 Chicago Galleries Association

1930 Chester Johnson Gallery, Chicago[57]

1932 Chicago Academy of Fine Arts[58]

1935 Quest Art Galleries, Chicago[59]

c.1935 Mulvane Art Museum, Washburn University, Topeka

1936 Chicago Academy of Fine Arts[60]

1937 Katherine Kuh Gallery, Chicago, portrait drawings[61]

1938 333 N. Michigan Avenue, Chicago[62]

1940 Katherine Kuh Gallery, Chicago

1941 (April) Katherine Kuh Gallery, Chicago

1947 Mortimer Levitt Gallery, NYC[63]

1948 Mortimer Levitt Gallery, NYC[64]

1950 Well of the Sea Gallery, Chicago[65]

1950 Palmer House art galleries[66]

1950 Gordon Artists Material Co. Gallery, Chicago

1951 Werner’s Books Gallery[67]

1951 Riccardo Studio Restaurant, Chicago[68]

1953 Jonson Gallery, University of New Mexico

1953 Lawson Art Gallery, Chicago[69]

1956 House of Arts, Chicago

1965 Bernard Horwich Center, Rosenstone Art Gallery, Chicago

1974 Gilman Galleries, Chicago

PERMANENT COLLECTIONS

Chicago Public Library

Illinois State Museum

INTERESTING NOTES

In Chicago he became one of the prime figures in the modernist movement. Weisenborn felt art was opposed to commercial progress and mores of the past. A fire in 1922 destroyed much of his earlier work. He was known for large-scale portrait figures where he used cubism and expressionism to portray his ideas. Sam Putnam, a respected critic of the day who felt modernism important to the understanding of art, described Weisenborn as a visionary.[70] Some biographical materials state he was the first Chicagoan to exhibit an abstract painting at the Art Institute of Chicago. While this is unconfirmed, he was certainly one of the first to break the representational mode of the juries at the Art Institute annual exhibitions.

ENDNOTES:

[1]In his biographical data sheet at the Ryerson Library, Art Institute of Chicago he listed 1881 as a birth year which conflicts with his Death Record from the State of Illinois. His son, West, recalls Rudolph died at the age of 94. Mack Gilman of Gilman Galleries in Chicago stated his birth year as 1881 in a one man retrospective, May 3, 1974 as do several other accounts.

[2]Clarence J. Bulliet, “Artists of Chicago Past and Present,” No. 11 in a series, Rudolph Weisenborn, Chicago Daily News, Art and Antiques Section, 5/4/1935, p.1. “In 1922 ...he married me, a dumb female Jewess who spent about $25 a week on books and prints by Maxfield Parrish.”

[3]“Biographical Data on Artist,” typescript by Rudolph Weisenborn, Ryerson Library Archives, Art Institute of Chicago, 1940. He funded his tuition by janitorial work.

[4]Op. cit., Chicago Daily News, 5/4/1935, p.1.

[5]The work is illustrated in Heather Becker, Art for the People, (San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 2002), p.96.

[6]This title taken from A Guide to Chicago’s Murals, (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001), p.407.

[7]Philip Kinsley, “Fair Gives New Opportunity To The Mural Arts,” Chicago Tribune, 7/9/1933, p.12. Op. cit., Chicago Daily News, 5/4/1935, p.1 and Mack Gilman, Rudolph Weisenborn (1882-1974) Retrospective exhibition, (Chicago: Gilman Galleries, 1974). The work was illustrated in the New York Times, 7/ 26?/1933, it was for the General Exhibits building, see the New York Public Library artist file W209/E6-W210/A2.

[8]George J. Mavigliano and Richard A. Lawson, The Federal Art Project in Illinois 1935-1943, (Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 1990), p.137. He most likely worked under the mural division as well given his work in 1937 and 1939 in the Crane and Nettlehorst schools.

[9]The work is illustrated in A Guide to Chicago’s Murals, (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001), p.269, and Heather Becker, Art for the People, (San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 2002), pp.33, 43, 95, 165, and discussed on pp.164-165.

[10]John & Molly Thwaites, “Seeing the Shows in Chicago,” Magazine of Art, Vol. 30, No .9, September 1937, pp.577-578. “Two New sets in Chicago of mural panels by Rudolph Weisenborn are probably the best mural paintings Midwestern projects have given us yet.” The article goes on to describe the murals in detail. The murals were subsequently removed, see: “Another W. P. A. Mural Disappears,” Art Digest, Vol. 17, 9/1/1943, p.17, and today are unlocated.

[11]Eleanor Jewett, “Art and Artists,” Chicago Tribune, 6/18/1922 in Art Institute of Chicago scrapbooks, vol. 43. Classes were held Monday, Tuesday and Friday evenings.

[12]Mack Gilman, Rudolph Weisenborn 1882-1974 Retrospective, (Chicago: Gilman Galleries, 1974). The Student record of Margaret Kate Hall Selleck confirms he was there at least through 1931: “Wants to paint ‘modern’ will meet Weisenborn and perhaps paint with him Sundays,” 11/8/1931. He was there as early as 1920, see: “News of the Art World,” Chicago Evening Post, 8/10/1920. He offered a Sunday class in which he hoped to attract a group of younger successful artists who would share their ideas with each other. “Such a union [of artists], it is hoped, will eventually cradle a really significant and progressive art movement.” See: “Seeks to Scotch Success Stigma by Sunday Class,” The Chicago Evening Post Magazine of the Art World, 12/17/1929, p.4. Eleanor Jewett, “News of Art and Artists,” Chicago Tribune, 7/13/1930, p.G3. Listed as faculty in “Chicago Academy to Enter 27th Summer,” Chicago Evening Post, 6/30/1931, Art Section, p.6. Listed as faculty member in “Practical Background for Commercial Art,” Chicago Evening Post, 9/6/1932, Art Section, p.6. “Added to Faculty,” Chicago Daily News, 9/2/1933, Art and Artists section, p.9. “Weisenborn’s Class Starts,” Chicago Daily News, 10/14/1933, Art and Artists section, p.7. C. J. Bulliet, “Around the Galleries: ” Chicago Daily News, 4/18/1936, Art, Antiques and The Artists section, p.4R. C. J. Bulliet, “Chicago Academy Opens 35th Season,” Chicago Daily News, 10/10/1936, Art, Antiques and The Artists section, p.4R.

[13]It was announced he re-joined the faculty to teach a Saturday class in C. J. Bulliet, “Around the Galleries: Weisenborn’s Class,” Chicago Daily News, 12/25/1938, Art and Music Section, p.24.

[14]“Weisenborn’s Class,” Chicago Daily News, 10/5/1935, Art, Antiques and The Artists section, p.4: “Rudolph Weisenborn is conducting a life drawing and painting class Sundays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in his studio, 1007 Rush Street.” A notice appears again in C. J. Bulliet, “Around the Galleries: Weisenborn’s Sunday Class,” Chicago Daily News, 9/12/1936, Art, Antiques and the Artists Section, p.4R. Edith Weigle, “Mexico Put on Canvas by Local Artist,” Chicago Tribune, 10/5/1947, p.G4.

[15]Rudolph Weisenborn, A Retrospective, (Chicago: Rosenstone Art Gallery, Bernard Horwich Center, 1965). Weisenborn, however, exhibited a self-portrait from Denver dated to 1915 and indicating he was still resident there then. C. J. Bulliet, “Around the Galleries: Weisenborn Retrospective,” Chicago Daily News, 2/5/1938, Art and Music section, p.24.

[16]His move into new quarters in 1923 was announced in Eleanor Jewett, “Art And Artists,” Chicago Tribune, 3/4/1923, p.D9.

[17]During the winter months, he lived in Chicago where in his studio he taught and painted - 674 Irving Park Road. The other months he lived at 418 Canyon Road in Santa Fe, NM.

[18]Marilyn Robb, “Art news from Chicago. Provincetown abstract,” Art News, Vol. 49, No. 7, November 1950, p.52.

[19]John R. Lane and Susan C. Larsen, editors, Abstract Painting and Sculpture in America 1927-1944, (Pittsburgh: Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute, 1984), p.36.

[20]“Progressive Artists Unite,” Art Digest, 2/15/1947, p.11. This organization later merged into the Artists’ Equity in 1950.

[21]C. J. Bulliet, “Artless Comment,” Chicago Daily News, 8/1/1936, Art, Antiques and The Artists section, p.4R. “Bulletin,” Artists Union of Chicago, No. 1, 2/1/1936, Archives of American Art, John Storrs Archives, Box 12, Folder 5-6, Miscellaneous Bulletins 1912-1966.

[22]Eleanor Jewett, “Gurley Memorial Collection on View at Art Institute,” Chicago Tribune, 9/3/1922, p.D8. Art critic C. J. Bulliet felt his departure from the group was the contributing factor to the demise of the importance of No-Jury shows. However, the Art Institute of Chicago began admitting “modern” paintings into juried shows in the late 1920s which surely accounted for the better part of the demise. His caricature appeared in Ben Hecht’s Chicago Literary Times, October 1924 as illustrated by Chicago artist Emil Armin with the quip: “Rudolph Weisenborn is called the chief pooh-bah or Trotsky of the insurgents…” His J. A. Dubow was illustrated in the third part of a three part article discussing independent societies in Chicago in The Chicago Evening Post Magazine of the Art World, 8/17/1926, p.3. His resignation was announced in “Weisenborn Quits as President of No-Jury,” The Chicago Evening Post Magazine of the Art World, 12/14/1926, p.1. There may have been some disagreement about direction of the group as he was pushing for a Gallery of Living Artists in Chicago and not everyone agreed with the use of funds from the No-Jury Ball. Mention is made of the fund-raising for the gallery in “Art Centers Make Ready for ‘No Jury’ Ball,” Chicago Daily Journal, 10/3/1924, p.4.

[23]Untitled newspaper article, Emil Armin Papers, Archives of American Art, Microfilm 1991 25, no. 3770, available in the Ryerson Library, Art Institute of Chicago.

[24]His design for the gallery, located in the back of his apartment/studio, appeared in The Chicago Evening Post Magazine of the Art World, 11/22/1927, p.3.

[25]Lena M. McCauley, “Jury Scored for ‘Shattering Faith’,” The Chicago Evening Post Magazine of the Art World, 10/30/1928, pp.1, 3, 11. The prize was awarded his Chicago. Eleanor Jewett, “Modernists Rule American Show: A Few Chicagoans,” Chicago Tribune, 10/28/1928, p.G6.

[26]“Ninety and Nine Open First Show in New Gallery in Pure Oil Building,” Chicago Evening Post, 12/8/1931, Art Section, p.12.

[27]Engaging With The Present: The Contribution of the American Jewish Artists Club to Modern Art in Chicago 1928-2004, (Chicago: Spertus Museum, 2004), p.15.

[28]Engaging With The Present: The Contribution of the American Jewish Artists Club to Modern Art in Chicago 1928-2004, (Chicago: Spertus Museum, 2004), p.51.

[29]He exhibited a portrait of art critic Sam Putnam. A similar work, portrait of John Grierson, was illustrated in The Chicago Evening Post Magazine of the Art World, 6/9/1925, p.5.

[30]Albert Ten Eyck Gardner, “Art For the Public,” Magazine of Art, Vol. 31, September 1938, pp.526-533. His work was illustrated in the article. C. J. Bulliet, “Around the Galleries: Weisenborn’s Bizarre Melodrama,” Chicago Daily News, 7/30/1938, Art and Music Section, p.15. His Diorama was illustrated in the same section, 8/13/1938, p.15.

[31]Title confirmed from Art Institute records. “Chicago Project,” Time Magazine, Vol. 32, 8/8/1936, p.34. He showed a plaster “diorama” entitled Reclamation of Eroded Farm Land.

[32]“Weisenborn Pictures Big Attraction at Art Exhibit; Chance for Local Art Lovers to Study ‘New Art’ Movement,” Cedar Rapids Republican, 4/16/1921, p.6. “Grant Wood Gives Talk on Art Today,” Cedar Rapids Evening Gazette, 4/14/1921, p.15.

[33]His Interior, illustrated in The Chicago Evening Post Magazine of the Art World, 11/16/1926, p.4, was called by critic Samuel Putnam “the most outstanding picture in this show,” in his article “Our Independents Invade Cabarets, on the same page.

[34]Eleanor Jewett, “Radical and Conservative Go Hand in Hand,” Chicago Tribune, 12/2/1928, p.I6. His work is featured by the columnist.

[35]Critic C. J. Bulliet commented: “Philosophical, too, is Rudolph Weisenborn’s ‘Convex Space’ – a conglomerate of female nudes, modern machinery and the strong male who dominates the machine – perhaps the nudes too.” “New Spirit Ignored for Nude, Still Life,” The Chicago Evening Post Magazine of the Art World, 3/10/1931, p.10.

[36]His work was illustrated in Edith Weigle, “Modern Art For You, The Jury,” Chicago Tribune, 2/17/1957, p.F24.

[37]The tour was to include works by about twenty modern Chicago artists and would be shown in London, Paris, Warsaw and Vienna, see: “Our Moderns Go Abroad,” in “News of the Art World,” supplement, Chicago Evening Post, 7/29/1924.

[38]“Many Attend Art Exhibit Opening; Paintings by Chicago Artists Are Displayed at the Coliseum,” Evansville Journal, 5/1/1922.

[39]C. J. Bulliet, in “Artless Comment,” “Sixteen Significant Chicago Painters, Chicago Daily News, 5/20/1933, Art and Artists section, p.17. His Chicago was chosen for this show by Bulliet.

[40]“Antiques, Auctions, Decoration,” Chicago Daily News, 4/15/1933, Art and Artists section, p.12, and “Mural ‘Ideas’ for Exposition,” Chicago Daily News, 4/22/1933, Art and Artists section, p.17.

[41]His portrait Ruth Baron, was illustrated in The Chicago Evening Post Magazine of the Art World, 6/21/1927, p.2. His portrait Llewellyn Jones, was illustrated in the 7/12 issue, p.2. His Max Haleff, was illustrated in the 7/26 issue, p.8.

[42]C. J. Bulliet, “What’ll We Do With It: An Inquiry Into the Future of Modern Art,” The Chicagoan, February 1932, p.43.

[43]Clarence J. Bulliet, “Ninety and Nine Open First Show in New Gallery in Pure Oil Building,” Chicago Evening Post Magazine of the Art World, 12/8/1931, p.12.

[43a]“ ‘No-Jury’ Artists Exhibit in Chicago,” American Art News, Vol. XX, No. 39, 8/19/1922, p.3.

[44]The exhibition was held between 4/9 and 4/21/1917.

[45]His Portrait, was illustrated in Evelyn Marie Stuart, “Annual Exhibition - Palette and Chisel Club,” Fine Arts Journal, Vol. 36, April 1918, p.4.

[46]He founded this exhibition with artist Ramon Shiva and Raymond Jonson. It was the beginning of a long series of Independent [of the Art Institute of Chicago] art exhibitions in which he would be central to founding.

[47]Advertisement in: Lena M. McCauley, “News Of The Art World,” supplement, Chicago Evening Post, 4/17/1917, p.9: “is known to Chicago art patrons as an artist of decorative ability. His work is done entirely in aquarelle and is of imaginative design.”

[48]“Current Art Shows,” Chicago Examiner, 4/27/1918, p.8.

[49]Lena M. McCauley, “Worth Seeing,” “News of the Art World,” supplement, Chicago Evening Post, 4/4/1922.

[50]“The Latest News,” in “News of the Art World,” supplement, Chicago Evening Post, 6/13/1922. A list of his works is included in the article. See also: Marguerite B. Williams, “Art Notes,” Chicago News, 6/21/1922. Eleanor Jewett, “Art And Artists,” Chicago Tribune, 6/25/1922, p.F10.

[51]“Rudolph Weisenborn,” The Chicago Evening Post Magazine of the Art World, 3/2/1926, p.6. One of the works was illustrated in the 3/9/1926 issue, p.16. His portrait of Chicago artist James Cady Ewell was illustrated in the 3/16/1926 issue, p.12.

[52]“Exhibit by Weisenborn,” The Chicago Evening Post Magazine of the Art World, 6/15/1926, p.6. It was announced in the 6/22 issue, p.6, the company obtained his portrait of Clarence Darrow for permanent exhibition in honor of his 70th birthday.

[53]His Structural Steel, was illustrated in The Chicago Evening Post Magazine of the Art World, 9/20/1927, p.6.

[54]“Show by Weisenborn,” The Chicago Evening Post Magazine of the Art World, 11/1/1927, p.5. “Playhouse Will Open Exhibition Room,” Chicago Daily News, 8/31/1927, in the Art Institute of Chicago scrapbooks, vol. 53, p.145.

[55]Organized as an outlet fro your talent in art, literature and drama, the Cube was located on Chicago’s South Side by the University of Chicago. “Exhibit by Weisenborn,” The Chicago Evening Post Magazine of the Art World, 2/14/1928, p.5.

[56]“Weisenborn at Woman’s Aid,” The Chicago Evening Post Magazine of the Art World, 11/18/1930, p.12. Inez Cunningham, “Weisenborn Showing at the Woman’s Aid,” The Chicago Evening Post Magazine of the Art World, 12/2/1930, p.12.

[57]C. J. Bulliet, “Weisenborn Caught in Swirl of Emotion,” The Chicago Evening Post Magazine of the Art World, 3/4/1930, p.4. The criticism is rather extensive. His Interior, was illustrated in the 3/11/1930 issue, p.4. Eleanor Jewett was scathing in her criticism in “Gerald A. Frank Wins $500 Award from the Municipal Art League,” Chicago Tribune, 3/6/1930, p.17.,

[58]“Academy Faculty Shows,” Chicago Evening Post, 7/26/1932, Art Section, p.6; “Paintings by Weisenborn,” in the 8/23 issue, p.6, and C. J. Bulliet, “Weisenborn in Little Show at Chicago Academy,” in the 8/30 issue, p.6. His portrait of a prone nude was in the 9/6 issue, p.6.

[59]C. J. Bulliet, “Around the Galleries: Weisenborn Still Experimenting,” Chicago Daily News, 4/13/1935, Art, Antiques and The Artists section, p.9.

[60]C. J. Bulliet, “Around the Galleries: ” Chicago Daily News, 4/18/1936, Art, Antiques and The Artists section, p.4R.

[61]C. J. Bulliet, “Around the Galleries: Abercrombie, Weisenborn,” Chicago Daily News, 4/3/1937, Art, Antiques and The Artists section, p.4R, and “Abercrombie, Weisenborn,” 4/3/1937, p.4R. His Abstract Portrait of Dr. Shapiro is illustrated in the Chicago Daily News, 4/24/1937,

[62]C. J. Bulliet, “Around the Galleries: Weisenborn Retrospective,” Chicago Daily News, 1/29/1938, 2/5/1938, Art and Music section, p.25 and p.24. His Wacker Drive is illustrated in the same section, 2/12/1938, p.25. Karl Gasslander, “The Art Portfolio,” Evanston News Index, 2/10/1938.

[63]The show is briefly, negatively reviewed in “Weisenborn of Chicago,” Art Digest, 2/1/1947, p.20. Levitt served as his gallery outlet at the time.

[64] “Weisenborn, Pioneer,” Art Digest, Vol. 22, 5/15/1948, p.11.

[65]Op. cit., Art News, November 1950, p.52. The opening was also announced in Art Digest, Vol. 25, 11/15/1950, p.34.

[66]C. J. Bulliet, “Art in Chicago: Season for Veterans,” Art Digest, Vol. 24, 4/15/1950, p.26 and Magazine of Art, Vol. 43, March 1950, p.118.

[67]C. J. Bulliet, “Art in Chicago,” Art Digest, Vol. 26, 12/15/1951, p.14.

[68]Art Digest, Vol. 25, 3/1/1951, p.34.

[69]Art Digest, Vol. 28, 11/1/1953, p.35.

[70]Samuel Putnam, “Neo-Arlimusc Idea,” Magazine of the Art World, Chicago Evening Post, December 21, 1926.

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